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Master of Bioethics for 2014

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Why study Master of Bioethics?

Over the past two decades, there has been increasing community concern about ethics in science, especially in the health sciences and the biological sciences.

The Master of Bioethics is a response to that concern, and will enable those taking it to deepen their understanding of ethical issues in health care and the biological sciences.

While the course is particularly well-suited to health care professionals and scientists who face complex ethical issues in their working lives, it will also be valuable for those involved in the formulation of public policy and law regarding these issues, as well as for anyone who simply wishes to explore issues of public concern in greater depth.

The course provides an interdisciplinary education that covers questions of life and death, ethical issues in patient care, legal issues in bioethics, and ethical issues in professional life.

Visit the Centre for Human Bioethics website for more information.

Master of Bioethics students who have completed at least one semester of the course are eligible to apply for an annual fellowship of $9000 to work during the Australian summer as an intern in the Department of Ethics, Equity, Trade and Human Rights at the World Health Organisation in Geneva.

Visit the Monash-WHO Fellowship page to read about past students' experiences working at the WHO.

Domestic

Entry requirements

View entry requirements and applications for domestic students

Duration

1.5 years full-time
3 years part-time

Fees for 2014

Fees are subject to change annually.

Commonwealth supported place (CSP)
Commonwealth supported place not offered for this course.

Domestic fee per 48 credit points
48 credit points represents a standard full-time course load for a year
$ 18,000 AUD

The Student Services and Amenities Fee applies to some students each calendar year.

Intakes

First Semester (March), Second Semester (July)

Attendances

  • On-campus at Clayton: full-time, part-time
  • Off-campus: full-time, part-time

Faculty

Faculty of Arts

Course code: 0122

CRICOS code: 077968G

Find out more

Enquire nowApply nowEntry requirements

Contact

Faculty of Arts
Tel: 1800 MONASH
(1800 666 274)
Web address: http://artsonline.monash.edu.au

International

Entry requirements

View entry requirements and applications for international students

Duration

1.5 years full-time

Fees for 2014

Fees are subject to change annually.

International fee per 48 credit points
48 credit points represents a standard full-time course load for a year
$ 27,400 AUD

Intakes

First Semester (March), Second Semester (July)

Attendances

  • On-campus at Clayton: full-time
  • Off-campus: full-time, part-time

Faculty

Faculty of Arts

Course code: 0122

CRICOS code: 077968G

Find out more

Enquire nowApply nowEntry requirements

Contact

International Student Enquiries
Telephone: +61 3 9903 4788
Online Enquiry: Click Enquire Now

Admissions information for domestic students

Entry requirements

Minimum entrance requirements

A bachelor's degree or equivalent, with at least a credit average in the final year.

Up to 24 points credit may be granted for applicants with a bachelor's degree with honours and a credit average in the final year in: medicine or any other health science; law; the biological or social sciences; or in a branch of the humanities such as philosophy OR a bachelor's degree or equivalent with at least a credit average in the final year in any of the field referred to above, and/or three-years documented relevant practical experience OR a related graduate diploma with a credit average.

University entrance requirements

Minimum entrance requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

Applications

Semester one (March)

Apply directly to Monash

For off-campus (distance education) studies, apply directly to Monash if you are a non-VTAC applicant.

Semester two (July)

Apply directly to Monash

For off-campus (distance education) studies, apply directly to Monash.

Admissions information for international students

Entry requirements

International entry requirements

A bachelor's degree or equivalent, with at least a credit average in the final year, or qualifications or experience that the faculty considers to be equivalent to or a satisfactory substitute for the above.

Up to 24 points credit may be granted for applicants with a bachelor's degree with honours and a credit average in the final year in: medicine or any other health science; law; the biological or social sciences; or in a branch of the humanities such as philosophy OR a bachelor's degree or equivalent with at least a credit average in the final year in any of the field referred to above, and/or three-years documented relevant practical experience OR a related graduate diploma with a credit average.

Please note English proficiency requirements must be met.

English requirements for international students

English language requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

University entrance requirements

Minimum entrance requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

Applications

Semester one (March)

Apply directly to Monash

Apply directly to Monash

For off-campus (distance education) studies, apply directly to Monash if you are a non-VTAC applicant.

Semester two (July)

Apply directly to Monash

Apply directly to Monash

For off-campus (distance education) studies, apply directly to Monash.

Enrolment obligation

International students enrolling in a CRICOS-registered course can study no more than 25% of their course by distance and/or online learning. Students cannot enrol exclusively in distance and/or online learning study in any compulsory study period. See standard 9.4 of The National Code 2007.

Study areas

BIOETHICS

The growth of scientific knowledge and technical ability in medicine, genetics and the biological sciences has led to a number of ethical dilemmas which perplex all of us, but especially those in the health care field. Does the fact that we can prolong the life of a patient in a permanent vegetative state mean that we should do so? Is destructive embryo experimentation justified by the prospect it offers of alleviating infertility? Should research designed to find 'gay genes' be conducted given that the results of such work might be used against homosexual people? Should we proceed with research trying to clone people? These and many other questions raise complex ethical and legal issues. The study, discussion and teaching of these issues has come to be known as bioethics - a field generally defined as covering the ethical issues raised by medicine, genetics and the biomedical sciences.