ATS2084 - Ancient mythologies - 2018

6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Arts

Organisational Unit

Centre for Ancient Cultures

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Hilary Gopnik

Coordinator(s)

Katherine McLardy

Unit guides

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2018 (Flexible)
  • First semester 2018 (On-campus)

Prerequisites

Twelve credit points of first-year Arts units.

Synopsis

This unit examines mythic patterns and their relation to ritual enactments in ancient times and across a variety of cultures including Indigenous Australia, the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome. We explore creation stories, tales of kings and heroes and rites surrounding birth, marriage, and death. We access these myths primarily through ancient texts but also incorporate insights from archaeology and art history. In addition, students will examine genres of ancient story-telling such as oral traditions, epic, and drama and will be introduced to the theoretical tools associated with the study of ancient mythology and religion.

Outcomes

  1. Be familiar with the myths of Indigenous Australia and the ancient Mediterranean.
  2. Identify the literary genres in which myths were written.
  3. Understand the theoretical approaches to mythology.
  4. Be aware of the socio-political contexts of myths.
  5. Apply critical thinking and research skills to investigate primary and secondary sources.

Assessment

Within semester assessment: 100%

Workload requirements

Minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this unit is 144 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study. A unit requires on average three/four hours of scheduled activities per week. Scheduled activities may include a combination of teacher directed learning, peer directed learning and online engagement.

See also Unit timetable information

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study